Speak Up: Millsboro’s last gristmill demolished

Posted 1/27/22

Photographs and memories. Aside from a few keepsake pieces claimed by history buffs and curiosity hounds, that’s all that remains of Warren’s Mill, the greater Millsboro area’s last …

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Speak Up: Millsboro’s last gristmill demolished

Posted

Photographs and memories. Aside from a few keepsake pieces claimed by history buffs and curiosity hounds, that’s all that remains of Warren’s Mill, the greater Millsboro area’s last known standing gristmill, which was demolished in mid-December.

  • I’m curious of the estimated cost to restore. How much was it and was that info made public? “However, based on cost and minimum financial return, that was determined an unfeasible option.” — Gere Durkin
  • Shame folks don’t value history. — Howard Gaines III
  • It would have been nice if they made some benches with the old wood from this place or even a table. — Sheila Shields
  • Wish I could have gotten some boards. — Glenn Wilkerson
  • With the price they charge us on water/sewer, the town could have saved this piece of history. — Rich Carroll
  • What was the cost to restore? If there was money needed for restoration, my family and many others would have donated for the restoration. — Raymond Fletcher
  • You guys loved it so much, you left it rotting in the woods. — Matt Adams
  • My thoughts exactly. Lived down the street from it my whole life, and no one gave a crap about it until they tore it down. — Kara Fisher
  • That’s the problem with our leaders. It’s all we care about, our community, until it comes down to the bottom dollar. — David James Farver
  • Bet a nice condo goes up there. — Betty Johnson-Jannuzzio

Study initiated to assure coordination between
Dover Air Force Base, municipalities

In an effort to support the ongoing mission of Dover Air Force Base, federal, state and local leaders plan to collaborate to ensure that civilian development doesn’t interfere with the military’s goals.

  • Maybe fully funding the Corps of Engineers’ plan to stop the bay erosion a few miles away would be a good part of that plan. The bay is on the verge of breaking into the wetlands, then the farmlands go, then the air base. — Steven Robert