Today In Salisbury's History: Tuesday, June 9, 1981

Posted 6/8/22

Tuesday, June 9, 1981 --

Wicomico school board members are blasting the Wicomico County Council’s decision to slash the fiscal 1983 school budget by 3.8 percent, cutting deeply into pay …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Tuesday, June 9, 1981

Posted

Tuesday, June 9, 1981 --

  • Wicomico school board members are blasting the Wicomico County Council’s decision to slash the fiscal 1983 school budget by 3.8 percent, cutting deeply into pay hikes sought for county teachers. “Of all my 11 years on the board, this is the saddest day,” said school board President R. Norman Peregoy. The board asked the county to fund 60 percent of its budget, or $14.2 million. The council said it would only fund $13 million. Superintendent Harold Fulton said he will now have to cut two high school teaching positions, two elementary teacher positions, one administrator and seven teachers aides. A negotiated 9 percent pay raise for teachers will be reduced to 2 percent.
  • WMDT-TV Channel 47 in Salisbury, now in the hands of a receiver because of financial losses that have prevented it from repaying a $3 million loan, is now under a court order not to hold a planned shareholders’ meeting this Friday. First National Bank of Maryland, the lender, was granted an injunction in Wicomico Circuit Court to block the meeting after the bank said a shareholders’ vote could “have a material adverse effect on the pledged collateral.” Judge Alfred T. Truitt last month placed the station in receivership at the bank’s request.
  • Last-minute changes to Salisbury’s fiscal 1982 spending plan were politely rejected Monday as the City Council approved an $8.3 million budget. Councilman Sam Seidel tried to talk his colleagues into cutting funding for the city’s ambulance services and eliminating ambulance service outside of the city limits. Seidel said the approximately $22,000 in savings could be used to lower the city property tax by a penny. Seidel has long maintained that the county should fund its own ambulance services out of its own budget.
  • Two foursomes representing the Green Hill Yacht & Country Club and the Elks Golf Club fired identical 22-under best ball scores to tie for first place in the Senior Golf Best Ball Tournament held at the Elks. After a match of cards, however, Wendell Henry and Herb Twigg, and Ken Nichols and Bill Anger of Green Hill were declared the winners.
  • Banks Convenience Stores and a related real estate firm have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection to reorganize and straighten out what the corporations’ lawyer called a “cash flow problem.” Attorney Charles Tatelbaum, representing Banks Dairy and Phillip H. Banks Inc., said the plan is to sell real estate owned by Banks and use the cash to pay off mortgages, which he said are the business’ major debt. He said the 17 Banks Convenience stores located across the Shore are themselves “doing very well” financially.
  • Jimmy Buffet and Ted Nugent have been added to the list of coming attractions at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center in Salisbury. Civic Center spokeswoman Lee Whaley said Buffet will appear July 11 and Nugent will be in town July 14. A “rapper’s convention” featuring the Sugar Hill Gang is scheduled next week. Judas Priest and Iron Maiden are scheduled to appear July 3.
  • Though work has been completed on a special drainage system at Leonard Mill Pond, the Wicomico Recreation and Parks Department will not authorize swimming there until at least next week. Department Director Gary Mackes said some minor problems in the drainage pipeline’s installation prevented dam gates from being opened earlier, which means water levels won’t reach safely swimmable levels until sometime next week.
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