Today In Salisbury's History: Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1975

By Greg Bassett
Posted 11/10/21

Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1975 --

Salisbury was to become the target of an economic boycott organized by labor at noon today, after City Hall rejected a bid for recognition by the local firefighters …

Create an account for additional free stories

Thank you for visiting BayToBayNews. Registered visitors can read 5 free stories per month. Visit our sign-up page to register for your free stories.


Start a digital subscription today!

Subscribers can read unlimited stories for a special introductory rate of $5.99 per month.

Subscribers, please log in to continue

Today In Salisbury's History: Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1975

Posted

Tuesday, Nov. 11, 1975 --

  • Salisbury was to become the target of an economic boycott organized by labor at noon today, after City Hall rejected a bid for recognition by the local firefighters union. The boycott announcement came from Fred C. Schillreff of Washington, D.C., a representative of the International Association of Firefighters. Mayor Elmer F. Ruark and the City Council have remained steadfast in their opposition to firefighters becoming municipal union employees. Firefighters are expected to join hundreds of other union members later today at a rally at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center.
  • Parking rates in Downtown Salisbury are going up. The price for five hours of parking will increase by about 5 cents, according to a Central City District Commission proposal approved by the City Council. The rate increases will go into effect after the first of the year. Fashion retailer John Hess, who heads the CCDC, said the parking money is needed to plan for the new $1.8 million expected to be built Downtown.
  • In an appearance at Salisbury State College, Dr. Margaret Mead -- America’s foremost anthropologist -- discussed several problems dancing the future world. Meade said more controls need to be placed on the plutonium used to fuel nuclear power plants and over-consumption in wealthy countries is causing starvation across the rest of the world. She also predicted that with people living longer, but the retirement age still fixed at 65, the elderly population will surge with millions of Americans essentially being idle within the economy for decades.
  • Parkside High School had many construction delays leading up to it September opening, but now there’s another problem facing the new $6.5 million structure -- its electrical system. At a school board meeting today, an electrical consultant raised questions about whether wiring in a wing of the building was properly grounded, which could lead to “exposure to shock.” School Building Commission Chairman W. Ryder Jones said the latest “punch list” list of uncompleted items exceeds 1,100 tasks.
  • The local outlet of the bankrupt W.T. Grant store chain has won an initial extension of its special going-out-of business-sale permit from the city of Salisbury, but will first have to pay $50 -- in cash. The Salisbury City Council demanded cash for the extension approval because the retail chain’s last check to the city -- $6,000 for taxes and water charges -- bounced. City Solicitor Walter C. Anderson said he has filed a claim against Grant’s in bankruptcy court. Meanwhile, the retailer will continue its distress sale at its Salisbury Shopping Center location.
  • Ceremonies were held today for the opening of the newly enlarged terminal building at the Salisbury-Wicomico Airport. The recent opening of a new hangar and office complex to serve Henson Aviation was also celebrated as part of the event. Attending the dedication were Alleghany Airlines Vice President Robert Jenkins, Henson Aviation President Richard Henson, Airport Commission Chairman Ed Kreamer, City Councilman Bob Powell, County Council President Albert Bailey and Frank Wilkerson of the Federal Aviation Administration.