Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, Oct. 21, 1999

By Greg Bassett
Posted 10/20/21

Thursday, Oct. 21, 1999 --

The Salisbury City Council has endorsed the Charter Review Committee’s recommendation of adopting a city-manager form of government. The proposed change will now …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, Oct. 21, 1999

Posted

Thursday, Oct. 21, 1999 --

  • The Salisbury City Council has endorsed the Charter Review Committee’s recommendation of adopting a city-manager form of government. The proposed change will now be reviewed by City Solicitor Paul Wilber in time for a first reading and public hearing in December. Under the recommendations, a mayor-council-manager form of government would be implemented. The appointed manager would supervise the city’s daily operations and personnel. The mayor and council would appoint the manager.
  • Perdue Farms is doing its part to ease the burden caused by Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina. The poultry company has raised $170,000 in cash, sent 200 tons for poultry products and collected enough emergency supplies to fill a convoy of tractor-trailers. The Perdue trucks will depart Salisbury on Friday for a Salvation Army warehouse in Greenville, N.C., which was especially hard hit by flooding.
  • Students eating lunch in the cafeteria of James M. Bennett High School received a shock Wednesday when rain water began cascading through the ceiling, dislodging ceiling tiles and drenching at least one student. Principal Donna Donohue said the student was not injured, but was permitted to go home and change clothes. A roof leak allowed water to pile up on the ceiling tiles, before the sagging ceiling gave way.
  • Two Main Street Gym boxers split their bouts in a competition in Anne Arundel County. Coach Hal Chernoff said Doel Carragrassio lost a tough four-round decision to Brooklyn Boxing’s Mike Pascal for the Maryland State Championship in the 156-pound division. Meanwhile, Salisbury’s Tyrone Reeves outgunned Norfolk’s Lamont Gorm, a previous winner of numerous titles.
  • Wicomico’s Public Works Department will soon begin the second phase of a $1.5 million project to clean out Coty Cox Branch off Naylor Mill Road. The branch extends from north Salisbury to Mitchell Pond, and then feeds to the Wicomico River. It passes through residential neighborhoods, so the project is equally about aesthetics and drainage. Half of the project is funded with state grants.
  • Henson Hall -- a $6 million science building dedicated to Salisbury philanthropist Richard A. Henson -- was officially opened on the campus of Wor-Wic Community College. At 34,000-square-feet, the structure will house laboratories and classrooms that will host programs associated with the Radiologic Technology, Nursing, Math and Science departments. Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Wicomico Council President Rusty Molnar were among the dignitaries who joined Henson at the ribbon cutting. 
  • Salisbury State University has begun its search for a new president to replace Dr. William C. Merwin, who departed the post in July. University System of Maryland President Dr. Donald Langenberg said Joel Jones will continue to serve as interim president until a successor is chosen. A search committee headed by Dr. Tom Jones will make the final recommendation. Langenberg said he expects more than 100 candidates to be considered.