Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Sept. 9, 1974

By Greg Bassett
Posted 9/8/21

Monday, Sept. 9, 1974 --

Tuesday is primary election day and several competitive races are on the ballot. Polls will be open in 23 precincts and 16 county election districts. Because of the …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Sept. 9, 1974

Posted

Monday, Sept. 9, 1974 --

  • Tuesday is primary election day and several competitive races are on the ballot. Polls will be open in 23 precincts and 16 county election districts. Because of the intensity of this year’s races, election officials are anticipating a registered voter turnout of more than 60 percent. The hottest contest is a Democratic Party battle between incumbent state Sen. Mary Nock and challenger E. Homer White. Also, 16 Democrats are challenging for five nominations to the Wicomico County Council.
  • Salisbury native and Maryland Congressman Paul S. Sarbanes said he is “surprised and dismayed” by President Ford’s weekend announcement that he has pardoned former President Richard Nixon. Sarbanes, a member of the House Judiciary Committee that voted to impeach Nixon, said he believes “the legal process should have been allowed to take its course.” Maryland U.S. Sen. Charles McC. Mathias also voiced strong objection to Ford’s decision. Maryland Congressman Larry Hogan Sr., also a House Judiciary Committee member, didn’t comment directly on Ford’s pardon but said he felt Nixon “has suffered enough already.”
  • The city of Salisbury has won a reprieve from state health officials over the city incinerator on Route 50 at Delaware Avenue. Because the city has thus far been unable to submit an approved plan for what to do with its garbage, the state will allow burning to continue until 1975.
  • Salisbury Mayor Elmer F. Ruark said he had received a personal note from President Ford, thanking the mayor for a document Ruark sent the new president last month. The City Council passed a resolution wishing Ford “good luck and godspeed” after Ford succeeded Richard Nixon. “It is encouraging to have the good will of the American people, and I am equally grateful for the support of the citizens of Salisbury,” Ford wrote to Ruark.
  • A lot of smoke and burned pigs feet awaited city firefighters who went rushing into an apartment on the Downtown Plaza this morning. A pot fire sent smoke billowing as pigs feet burned in the cookware at about 3:27 a.m. in an apartment rented by Joseph Bradshaw. While firefighters said they found a lot of smoke, there was no blaze to extinguish.
  • The Salisbury City Council is expected to award a new $2.2 million water plant in the North Paleo Channel near Naylor Mill Road. The city has obtained a $1.06 million federal grant to help pay for the plant, which will feature a 1-million-gallon underground reservoir and automated deep-well turbine pumps. 
  • Salisbury poultry business leader Frank Perdue said he is adjusting to the fame he has gained throughout the Northeast because of his many television commercials in the New York, Boston and Philadelphia markets. Perdue, 54, said his commercials have apparently “appealed to the American sense of humor” and he is recognized often while on the streets of New York City, when he is visiting on business.
  • The Wicomico County Council has voted to keep the Brick Kiln Landfill open to the public seven days a week. The council has been under pressure to open the landfill on Sundays, especially during the fall season when residents might need to take leaves and branches to the facility.