Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Aug. 19, 1985

By Greg Bassett
Posted 8/17/21

Monday, Aug. 19, 1985 --

On Sunday, the Delmarva Peninsula set a 10-year record for rainfall as between 6 and 9 inches fell across the Shore. At the Salisbury water treatment plant, the official …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Aug. 19, 1985

Posted

Monday, Aug. 19, 1985 --

  • On Sunday, the Delmarva Peninsula set a 10-year record for rainfall as between 6 and 9 inches fell across the Shore. At the Salisbury water treatment plant, the official rainfall total was logged at 6.49 inches. The torrential rains caused flooding in several areas. According to University of Maryland Extension Service Agent Wayne Shaff, the rainfall is both good and bad news for local farmers, who have been concerned about drought conditions all summer. Shaff said the rain will help some crops, but plants in standing water will likely be damaged.
  • State Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein was the commencement speaker as Wor-Wic Community College celebrated 99 graduates in a ceremony held in the auditorium of Wicomico Senior High School. Dr. Stephen Capelli, Dean of Instruction at Wor-Wic, announced co-valedictorian honors were shared by Linda Marie Gillis and Dawn L. Willey, both of Salisbury, who compiled 4.0 grade point averages.
  • Philip T. English of English Realty and Insurance in Salisbury announced his companies will take free photos of area children this week in response to growing concerns about missing children. A computer will be set up in the Mount Hermon Road office to print a label containing vital information about the child and the date the photo was taken. The information will automatically be attached to each photo after it is developed. Parents can give the photo to police agencies if necessary.
  • The number of students expected to attend Wicomico County public schools this year will be down by eight students compared to last year. Director of Curriculum Sheldon Larmore said enrollment had fallen for 13 years in a row, before increasing last year -- only to see a minimal decrease this coming year. In 1970-71, the school population was 14,572; the number this school year will be 11,309.
  • The Super Soda women’s softball team came away with a 9th-place finish out of a field of 36 teams in the ASA Class C tournament in Hagerstown. Super Soda dropped its first game 2-1 before fighting back in the losers’ bracket, only to lose Sunday morning. Dana Lynne Illian led the tournament with an .875 batting average. Sharone Grant boomed a pair of homers and a triple, while Boe Harris provided excellent pitching, walking just one batter the entire tournament. The team was managed by Bill Taylor.
  • About 100 people attended a public hearing held last week at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center to express their viewpoints on a jail proposal for the county. Wicomico officials have identified 40 possible locations for the $29 million facility, most of which are on the west side of the county. Most people testifying said they did not want the jail located near any residential communities. Some said the county should build the jail elsewhere, pointing out that the west county already has a landfill and sewage treatment plant located near residential clusters.
  • State Sen. Joseph J. Long, 64, is walking around these days with his left arm in a sling. Long said he is suffering from “pitcher’s elbow,” which is somewhat like tennis elbow. Long was a star pitcher at Wicomico High School in the early 1940s and later a semi-pro hurler. He said he recently re-injured his elbow when he tripped on a garden hose at his home on South Park Drive in Salisbury.