Today In Salisbury's History: Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1998

By Greg Bassett
Posted 9/28/21

Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1998 --

All hope has not been lost for a multi-million-dollar restaurant project next to the Port of Salisbury Marina. Salisbury Mayor Barrie Parsons Tilghman said local …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1998

Posted

Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1998 --

  • All hope has not been lost for a multi-million-dollar restaurant project next to the Port of Salisbury Marina. Salisbury Mayor Barrie Parsons Tilghman said local developer Frank Hanna has told the city he is still considering the possibility of building a waterfront restaurant and bar. The fate of the project was thrown into uncertainty earlier this month when Hanna balked at paying the city $125,000 for a piece of riverfront property. Hanna was considering building a restaurant to be named Brew River and estimated he would spend up to $2 million on the project. 
  • The Eastern Shore seafood industry is rebounding from disastrous year-long sales attributable to the public health scare over Pfiesteria. Bill Murphy, manager at S.T. Moore & Co. said that while business last summer was slow, he believes he made up about half of the sales he lost a year ago. Though state health officials tried to reassure the public as long as any fish consumed did not have lesions or sores, seafood sales still plummeted.
  • Maryland State Police are setting up speed traps all over Wicomico County in pre-announced locations. Lt. Edwin Lashley, Salisbury barrack commander, said that by disclosing speed trap locations in advance, drivers might slow down everywhere. “I would rather have voluntary compliance than issue citations,” Lashley said. One speed trap that will receive extra attention is Naylor Mill Road near West Road, Lashley said.
  • Salisbury City Councilman Frank Himelright is blasting officials in the city’s Purchasing Department for paying $300 a piece for new ergonomically correct chairs in the Finance Department. Himelright cited the chair purchases when he persuaded the council to table nearly $250,000 in bid requests for an array of city needs. City Purchasing Agent Carol M. Turner said the office chairs in question were subjected to vendor bids.
  • City and community leaders are taking another step toward trying to improve the relationship between the Salisbury Police Department and the people it protects. Already on board with an American Civil Liberties Union program designed to open lines of communication, city police are making monthly meetings with the local NAACP chapter a part of their Community Policing approach.
  • Delmarva Power has officially changed its name to Conectiv Power Delivery. Utility spokesman Matt Likovich said the name change was the final stage in the March merger between Delmarva Power and Atlantic City Electric Co.
  • Workers began pouring concrete this week for what will be the Richard A. Henson Allied Health and Science Building on the campus of Wor-Wic Community College. The 34,000-square-foot three-story building is expected to be completed by summer 1999. Wor-Wic Vice President Dr. Stephen Capelli said the new building will house labs and classrooms for nursing, radiologic technology and science programs now filled to capacity.