Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, June 2, 1993

By Greg Bassett
Posted 6/2/21

Thursday, June 2, 1993 --

Ending a 10-month debate and avoiding a likely court battle with the American Civil Liberties Union, the Salisbury City Council struck down its law which allowed the …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, June 2, 1993

Posted

Thursday, June 2, 1993 --


  • Ending a 10-month debate and avoiding a likely court battle with the American Civil Liberties Union, the Salisbury City Council struck down its law which allowed the city’s nonresident property owners to vote in municipal elections. Council members Mary Pinkett, Tim Sakemiller and Robin Cockey voted to remove the law from the City Charter, while Councilmen Bob Caldwell and Bob Gladden dissented. Now, City Attorney Bob Eaton will negotiate a settlement with the ACLU, which sued city officials, claiming nonresident voting is unconstitutional.

  • The Salisbury Post Office has made changes in the way it handles mail that will allow post office box customers to receive their mail by 8:30 each morning. Since all mail began moving through the Easton mail hub this year, business customers with post boxes have been reporting late and delayed mail. Regional Postal Manager Paul Alexander said a special quality committee has been formed to address late- or delayed mail complaints.

  • At the 16th annual Service Awards Banquet held by the Wicomico Board of Education at the Applied Technology Center, 158 employees were formally honored.Saluted for 35 years of service were James M. Bennett Senior High School Cafeteria Manager Dorothy Paige, Chipman Elementary teacher Marva Daily, Supervisor Ed Carey and Westside Intermediate Vice Principal Eleanor Conway.

  • Wednesday was a confusing day for Salisbury-area radio listeners. WKHI-FM at 99.9 on the dial, which had been a Top-40 rock station based in Ocean City, became Froggy 99.9 -- “Delmarva’s Hottest Country.” The change gives Salisbury two powerful Country music stations, with longtime country-format favorite WICO-FM 94.3 already in the market.


  • Congressman Wayne T. Gilchrest was among the dignitaries who sampled ribs at a new restaurant that opened this week in Fruitland -- Adam’s the Place for Ribs. General Manager Peter Roskovich said his establishment will also feature chicken, steaks, homemade cole slaw, and beef and pork barbecue. Also attending the opening were Fruitland Chamber of Commerce President Bunk Mann and Chamber board member Bobbie Loreman.

  • The Gateway Project in Downtown Salisbury will be open this week for public inspection as part of the 11th annual Salisbury Strawberry Fair. The project connects the Downtown Plaza with the city’s municipal parking lot. Pedestrians will be able to walk through the building, passing indoor shops and businesses along the way. The tunnel-like passageway is expected to formally open in September. 

  • The Wicomico County Council has given the tire recycling vendor it hired just 30 days to show revenue gains or shut down. Wicomico Recycling Corp. of Salisbury has been unable to find markets for the tires it has shredded. There are now more tires gathered at the Blackwater Transfer Station near Delmar than there were before the company was hired, siad county Public Works Director P. Rai Sharma.

  • The Rev. Olin J. Shockley of Trinity Methodist Church in Salisbury will celebrate his 40th anniversary in the ministry on June 6. A Worcester County native, Shockley is well known for his supportive and optimistic ministerial style. The Trinity congregation has more than 1,600 members.