Review pushes COVID-related deaths near 3,000 in Delaware

By Tim Mastro
Posted 7/9/22

DOVER — After a review of Vital Statistics records, Delaware is nearing 3,000 COVID-19-related deaths.

The Delaware Division of Public Health said Friday it found 11 COVID-19-related deaths …

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Review pushes COVID-related deaths near 3,000 in Delaware

Posted

DOVER — After a review of Vital Statistics records, Delaware is nearing 3,000 COVID-19-related deaths.

The Delaware Division of Public Health said Friday it found 11 COVID-19-related deaths in Vital Statistics reports from October 2021 to June 2022. It also reported three new current deaths for a total of 14 in Friday’s update.

The 14 deaths bring the state’s COVID-19-related death toll to 2,998.

Delaware’s death rate related to COVID-19 has slowed in recent months. There have been only 15 new deaths to occur since June 1 and 122 since March 1. This is down from the winter peak when the state recorded 321 in January alone followed by 146 in February.

New Castle County, the state’s largest county, has the most COVID-19-related deaths with 1,456. Sussex County is next with 878 while Kent County has recorded 664.

Of the 2,998 deaths, 2,371 have been in individuals 65 years old or older which is 79%. Long-term care facility residents have made up 967 of all COVID-19-related deaths (32%).

The number of individuals hospitalized with COVID-19 is down to 98, according to the state’s report on Friday. This is down from 132 hospitalizations 30 days ago.

Of those currently hospitalized, six cases are considered critical.

Delaware’s seven-day rolling average for new positive cases is at 227 cases per day. That has dipped from 30 days ago when the state was averaging 359.1 new cases per day.

Delaware remains under Public Health Emergency order which Gov. John Carney’s office says allows the state and its medical providers to continue COVID-19 vaccination and testing programs.

Under Delaware law, Public Health Emergency declarations must be renewed every 30 days. It was last renewed on June 24.

“It’s important people stay one step ahead of COVID-19,” Gov. Carney said in a statement. “Keep doing the things we know that work. Stay home if you’re sick and get tested. Mask up in public indoor settings or if you are at a higher risk for illness. Get vaccinated and boosted when you’re eligible.”

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