Gov. Carney signs off on multiple bills

By Joseph Edelen
Posted 9/2/22

In addition to visiting schools throughout the state this week, Gov. John Carney signed multiple pieces of legislation into effect.

Senate Joint Resolution 6, which effectively recognized Aug. 31 …

You must be a member to read this story.

Join our family of readers for as little as $5.99 per month and support local, unbiased journalism.


Already a member? Log in to continue.   Otherwise, follow the link below to join.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Gov. Carney signs off on multiple bills

Posted

In addition to visiting schools throughout the state this week, Gov. John Carney signed multiple pieces of legislation into effect.

Senate Joint Resolution 6, which effectively recognized Aug. 31 as International Overdose Awareness Day in Delaware, was signed by the governor on Monday in addition to three bills related to early and digital literacy in Delaware schools.

On Tuesday, three more bills were signed into effect. The first, House Bill 447, requires cases or charges more than seven years old to be treated as “resolved in the favor of” a child or adult so long as there is no disposition for the case or outstanding warrants for the individual. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Nnamdi Chukwuocha, D-Wilmington, implemented findings from the African American Task Force’s Safety and Justice Subcommittee and will prevent record keeping errors from preventing a qualified petitioner from expungement.

The second bill, House Bill 375, was sponsored by Rep. Stephanie T. Bolden, D-Wilmington, and also builds off of recommendations from the African American Task Force. The legislation establishes the Racial Equity Consortium to study the disparities and inequities that people of color face in the state. The Consortium, which was recommended by the Task Force, is responsible for making recommendations on how to address these disparities.

The final bill signed by Gov. Carney this week was Senate Bill 277, which was sponsored by Sen. Sarah McBride, D-Wilmington. The legislation seeks to provide access to dental care for members of underserved communities by increasing opportunities for federally qualified health centers and government-operated dental clinics to serve these communities. Under the law, federally qualified health centers and government-operated dental clinics to serve these communities will be helped in the recruitment of dentists to serve those in need.

Members and subscribers make this story possible.
You can help support non-partisan, community journalism.