Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, July 14, 1983

By Greg Bassett
Posted 7/14/22

Thursday, July 14, 1983 --

A series of lawsuits that grew out of a conflict involving two Salisbury tennis promoters has been settled out of court. William F. Riordan and William L. Dennis agreed …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Thursday, July 14, 1983

Posted

Thursday, July 14, 1983 --

  • A series of lawsuits that grew out of a conflict involving two Salisbury tennis promoters has been settled out of court. William F. Riordan and William L. Dennis agreed this week to terms worked out by their attorneys. Dennis, who promoted three World Championship Tennis events at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center, signed a letter of apology to Riordan and agreed to pay the former U.S. Indoors Championship promoter $2,500. Riordan initiated the lawsuit because he believed Dennis interfered with his effort to attract a professional women’s tournament to Salisbury.
  • If Hollywood made a movie out of what was going on in Downtown Salisbury on Wednesday, it would have to be titled “The Machine That Ate Main Street.” For most of the day, a noisy machine inched its way down a three-block stretch of East Main Street, gobbling up asphalt and depositing it into dump trucks. The milling machine was brought to Salisbury from York, Pa., to scoop up chunks of asphalt that can be recycled for other paving jobs. City officials said the $140,000 repaving of East Main should be completed by Aug. 1.
  • Construction of a 68-unit subsidized housing project off Parsons Road has been restarted, now that several legal challenges have been dismissed. Oxford Group of Landover, Md., which is developing the $2.4 million community, has obtained government-backed financing and has posted a bond so construction can continue. The project was delayed by legal maneuvering initiated by the developers of Pemberton Manor Associates, which is located just across the street. Attorneys for Pemberton Manor had contended the Salisbury City Council erred when it approved rezoning of Oxford’s property from industrial to residential.
  • The Salisbury Fire Department has created a 12-man volunteer diving unit to assist with underwater rescues and searches. The Underwater Recovery Unit recently recovered suspected stolen tools from a creek bottom near Vienna at the request of Maryland State Police. The volunteers, many of whom had no previous diving experience, are using their own or borrowed equipment and are undergoing training from diving instructor Ozzie Hilderson.  

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