Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Jan. 27, 1975

By Greg Bassett
Posted 1/25/22

Monday, Jan. 27, 1975 --

The 1975 March of Dimes Mothers’ March for Wicomico County produced more than $11,848 in contributions. Mrs. Louis W. White, county Mothers’ March chairwoman, …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Monday, Jan. 27, 1975

Posted

Monday, Jan. 27, 1975 --

  • The 1975 March of Dimes Mothers’ March for Wicomico County produced more than $11,848 in contributions. Mrs. Louis W. White, county Mothers’ March chairwoman, saluted an army of volunteer collectors for their hard work. White said last year’s fund-raising total was $12,442, so she is hoping some last-minute contributions will be coming in before the month’s end.
  • Agents from the FBI’s Baltimore field office are in Salisbury, checking out leads in the latest bank robbery to strike the area – today’s holdup and theft of just under $5,000 from the First National Bank in the Waverly Shopping Center. Four bank robberies have occurred in Salisbury in the last four months. Today’s robbery featured a suspect who entered the bank wearing a ski mask, slammed a handgun on the counter, pulled out a green trash bag, and told a teller to “fill it up.”
  • Charles C. Bounds of Salisbury has been re-elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Ward Foundation. Joining Bounds on the board will be Max P. Hughes, Ted Crocket, Knute R. Bartrug, Harvest Derby, Robert Tolley Ron Rue and Robert H. Farlow. Bounds announced that Hugh Godsey has agreed to donate three decorative decoys carved by Lem Ward in the 1940s.
  • The Salisbury City Council will vote Feb. 10 on whether to create the city’s first Historic District in the Newtown area. After a 75-minute hearing held tonight at City Hall, a compromise version of the controversial ordinance was given unanimous approval to head for a final vote. About 100 people attended the hearing to support the districting plan.
  • The plug is back in Johnson’s Lake because when the city pulled it, water supply problems were created for some waterside residents. City Public Works Director Pete Cooper said plans for lowering the lake to take advantage of freezing weather to help kill off algae were abandoned when water emergency reports came in. He said the trouble developed over the weekend when about eight residences on Kipling Drive found themselves without water.
  • The Peninsula General Hospital Medical Center Campaign is stepping up its efforts to raise $2.6 million from Wicomico County residents to be used toward construction of a $26.2 million center addition. Campaign volunteers are attempting to raise an additional $4.8 million from the regional counties that will rely on the new facility. Older buildings of the current medical campus will be retained, but most medical treatment will occur in the new five-story, 235,000-square-foot addition.  
  • Josephine Ann “Josie” Psota, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Psota of Monument Square and a senior at Wicomico Senior High School, is spending the year in Durban, South Africa. After spending several days in New York City for orientation in the American Field Service, the 17-year-old flew from Kennedy Airport to Johannesburg. She was accompanied to New York by her parents and her brother, John David, 12.