Speak Up: Encryption of Delaware police radios creates some static

Posted 7/23/21

Joining other states’ law enforcement agencies, Delaware State Police encrypted all their radio transmission channels March 22. That has been done, police officials said, in an effort to …

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Speak Up: Encryption of Delaware police radios creates some static

Posted

Joining other states’ law enforcement agencies, Delaware State Police encrypted all their radio transmission channels March 22. That has been done, police officials said, in an effort to protect the privacy of victims, as well as the safety of officers. But others are concerned that the move limits the public’s right to know.

  • Old news, but it keeps law enforcement safe. People do not need a minute update, and that is what some were doing. — Bobbi Costello

 

Wawa expanding to Georgetown, more

Gotta have a Wawa? If so, you’re in luck, as a link in the convenience store’s chain is heading to the heart of Sussex County. Georgetown Mayor Bill West said the store will be built at the intersection of U.S. 113 and Edward Street, at the former site of Auto Pros. There is no timetable for construction to begin, he added. Just north of the future Wawa, there are plans for a car wash. And property to the north of the car wash is earmarked for an auto parts store.

  • This decision was all about the money. It is already nearly impossible to enter or cross the highway at that location. They could not possibly have seriously considered how much the addition of one — let alone three — businesses to that small stretch of highway would worsen the situation. Accidents will ensue. — Rhonda Postles

Ørsted describes wind farm proposal off Delaware coast during webinar

Danish clean-energy company Ørsted has expanded plans for wind farm projects off Delmarva’s coast that could power 250,000 homes in Maryland and other mid-Atlantic states. However, the double-pronged proposal — Skipjack 1, a 120-megawatt project approved by Maryland’s Public Service Commission in 2017, and Skipjack 2, a much larger proposal still in the bidding process — continues to fan questions.

Recently, Ørsted submitted a bid to the Maryland PSC to develop Skipjack 2, a proposed project of up to 760 megawatts. Delaware’s coast is the preferred location for the initiative’s land-based interconnects. During a virtual webinar hosted by Ørsted on Monday, Deb Henry, the project’s development director, said site selection is ongoing.

  • Build them. Wind is clean and free. — Ruth Ashby