Downtown Salisbury stabbing is first homicide of the year

By Liz Holland
Posted 12/7/22

Downtown Salisbury stabbing is first homicide of the year

Maryland State Police were continuing their search for the suspect in an early morning homicide in a parking lot on West Market Street in …

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Downtown Salisbury stabbing is first homicide of the year

Posted

Downtown Salisbury stabbing is first homicide of the year

Maryland State Police were continuing their search for the suspect in an early morning homicide in a parking lot on West Market Street in Salisbury.

Riley Lee Collick, 44, of Fruitland, is wanted for first-degree murder in the death of Alejandro Roland Exantus, 32, of Laurel, police said.

It is the first homicide in the city this year, said Mayor Jake Day. The last time a murder was committed in Salisbury was in October 2021 when Emanual Jones, 42, died of gunshot wounds in a house on Martin Street.

In Sunday’s incident, officers from the Salisbury Police Department responded to a city lot in the 100 block of West Market Street for a report of a stabbing shortly before 12:45 a.m. Sunday, police said.

Collick and Exantus were involved in an argument that turned physical. Collick is accused of stabbing Exantus before fleeing the scene in a 2012 silver Cadillac CTS, police said.

Exantus was taken by ambulance to TidalHealth Peninsula Regional where he was declared dead.

Investigators from the Maryland State Police Homicide Unit will be conducting the investigation, with assistance from the Salisbury Police Department and the Capital Area Region Fugitive Task Force.

Collick has faced multiple charges in the past, including a 2006 conviction in Worcester County for assault that resulted in a 10-year prison sentence, according to online court records. He also has been charged in the past for armed robbery in Snow Hill and drug possession in Pocomoke City, both in 2000.

Homicides in Salisbury are fairly rare, Day said. The city has even had a few years with zero murders, including 2019, 2016 and 2015.

Anyone with information in Sunday’s case or who may have been in the area of the crime scene is asked to call Crime Solvers at 410-548-1776 or the Maryland State Police Salisbury Barrack at 410-749-3101. Callers may remain anonymous.

Former sheriff’s deputy indicted on sex crimes

The grand jury for Wicomico County returned an indictment charging Steven Victor Abreu with committing a series of criminal offenses against five separate victims in the months of September and October.

Abreu is accused of using his position as a Wicomico County Sheriff’s Deputy to sexually assault women while on duty – the 50-count indictment includes nine counts of rape in the first degree and 14 counts of misconduct in office.

“Our community has every right to expect the highest level of professionalism and respect when interacting with law enforcement officers,” said State’s Attorney Jamie L. Dykes.“We are committed to holding accountable those that betray their oath and abuse the authority of their badge.”

The case is being investigated by the Criminal Investigations Division of the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office, and prosecuted by Assistant State’s Attorneys Patrick M. Gilbert and Lauren N. Bourdon.

An initial appearance has been scheduled for Dec. 16 in Circuit Court.

If convicted, Abreu faces a maximum sentence of life in prison.

Based on their investigation, law enforcement believes that there may be additional victims. If you believe you may have been a victim, or have information concerning these charges, please contact Detective Christine Kirkpatrick of the Criminal Investigations Division of the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office at 410-548-4898.

An indictment is not a finding of guilt. An individual charged by indictment is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceeding.

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