Today In Salisbury's History: Saturday, June 16, 1979

By Greg Bassett
Posted 6/15/22

Saturday, June 16, 1979 --

The long gas lines being experienced by motorists in the Baltimore and Washington areas have yet to materialize on the Eastern Shore, but gasoline vendors say that could …

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Today In Salisbury's History: Saturday, June 16, 1979

Posted

Saturday, June 16, 1979 --

  • The long gas lines being experienced by motorists in the Baltimore and Washington areas have yet to materialize on the Eastern Shore, but gasoline vendors say that could all change soon. In an attempt to curtail motorists from “topping off” their tanks with only minor purchases, Maryland Gov. Harry R. Hughes issued an executive order mandating minimum purchase amounts – $5 for 4-cylinder cars and $7 for 8-cylinder cars. Hughes has blamed “panic buying” across the state for contributing to gas shortages.
  • Salisbury’s dogwood trees might be getting a break. Wicomico County Extension Agent Wayne Shaff said the Cottony Camellia scale is being attacked by the larvae of the Ladybird Beetle, the scale’s natural predator. Earlier this spring, the scale damage was evident in many dogwoods. At a time when the pink and white trees would normally be blooming, many trees were sparse on blooms and foliage. Shaff, however, said that the larvaes’ attacks could be winding down; he is advising dogwood owners not to spray pesticides just yet.
  • John E. Hess, President of Hess Apparel in Salisbury, has announced the promotion of George George to the position of Manager of the Downtown Plaza store. George will continue in his role as Junior Shoe Buyer. Richard Rosenholtz has been tapped to serve as Manager of the Salisbury Mall store. Cheryl Hoke and Linda Sheesley were named Selling Supervisors for the mall store.
  • The Eastern Shore Savings and Loan Men’s 30-And-Over Invitational Tennis Tournament resumes today at the YMCA in Salisbury after the four top singles seeds advanced in Friday’s opening matches. At 10 a.m., No. 1 seed Jim Ewers will play Jerry Holt; No. 2 seed Bob Still faces Harrison Langeler; No. 3 seed Dr. John Routenberg plays Steve Pusey and No. seed New Jackson will lock horns with Ben Meney.   
  • A crowd estimated at 2,100 people attended the Scouting Air Expo held at Salisbury-Wicomico Regional Airport. Expo co-chairman Gerald Truitt said he was enthused at the turnout, despite gasoline shortages that had threatened to keep spectators away. Three military units that had been expected to fly canceled at the last moment because they couldn’t get fuel. The top attraction appeared to be the radio-controlled plan demonstration sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Radio Kontrol Society.
  • Wicomico Board of Education President J. Morris Jones announced he will not seek a second appointed term. The 71-year-old former Social Studies teacher at Wicomico Senior High was appointed in 1975 by Gov. Marvin Mandel. “I just don’t seem to enjoy it as much as I used to,” Jones said in an interview. “It’s my feeling the public needs a younger person on the board who will look to the future.”
  • Parkside High School star pitcher Lee Shockley’s lifetime dream became a reality after he signed a contract to play baseball for the New York Mets. Shockley, who lives on Carey Avenue in Salisbury, was drafted this month in the 9th round of Major League Baseball’s 1979 draft. He was the 210th player chosen, Shockley, 18, a right-hander, received an undisclosed signing bonus and will report to Mets rookie camp in Little Falls, N.Y., on June 22. 
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