Salisbury will sell off Mitchell Landing Apartments

By Liz Holland
Posted 8/30/21

Salisbury City Council members have declared Mitchell Landing Apartments as surplus property, the first step in selling the 2.68-acre property.

With the council’s approval in hand, the …

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Salisbury will sell off Mitchell Landing Apartments

Posted

Salisbury City Council members have declared Mitchell Landing Apartments as surplus property, the first step in selling the 2.68-acre property.

With the council’s approval in hand, the city’s Department of Procurement can now invite bids or proposals for development or prepare for an auction sale. The property is valued at $1.06 million by the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation.

The move comes after a serious maintenance issue was discovered in June, requiring the relocation of all the tenants in that building.

As soon as the management company for the complex detected a problem with a support beam, the city took action by moving the tenants and calling in a structural engineer, Deborah Stam, the city’s Grants Manager, told council members at a June 21 work session.

The city paid for all of the tenants’ moving expenses, including packing up all of their belongings, with up to $20,000 authorized for that purpose by the state Department of Housing and Community Development, Stam said.

City Administrator Julia Glanz said that all of the buildings in the complex have since been inspected. The city is now moving forward with addressing any problems, she said.

City Councilwoman April Jackson, who represents the district that includes Mitchell Landing, asked what will happen to tenants who have leases as well as those who were relocated.

“I want to make sure those people aren’t displaced,” she said.

The city can stipulate in the sale agreement that the new owner must honor current leases and also allow the relocated tenants to return if they want, Glanz told her.

This property at 135 Mitchell Road has five buildings with a total of 24 apartments, a management office, laundry room and community room.

The city bought the property in 1984 from the Salisbury Brick Co. for $200,000, according to state land records.