Speak Up: Millsboro Police Department alters tattoo policy

Posted 10/20/21

Body art is commonly displayed in today’s world. But Millsboro Police Chief Brian Calloway admits he isn’t a fan of tattoos. But “at the end of the day, this is tough when you try …

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Speak Up: Millsboro Police Department alters tattoo policy

Posted

Body art is commonly displayed in today’s world. But Millsboro Police Chief Brian Calloway admits he isn’t a fan of tattoos. But “at the end of the day, this is tough when you try to recruit people.” With that, council approved the chief’s requested revision to departmental policy, allowing acceptable tattoos to be visible on the arms or left ring finger of any agency officer while on duty. It was a 6-0 vote.

  • I don’t really trust cops that much generally, but I trust the ones with sleeve tats more than I do the ones with no tats. — Wayne Grimm
  • That’s just dumb. — Brandon Skeen
  • Officers (going) around with full sleeves: Gross for one, and police are supposed to be clean-cut and looking good. Tattoos are destroying what God has given you. I don’t like them either. — Rodger Workman
  • Sounds like a “you” problem and not a “them” problem. — Pete Schonert
  • And that, sir, is called discrimination. — Ed Bell
  • No, it’s not. People with tattoos are not a protected class of people. — Michael Brittingham
  • Don’t like ’em, then don’t get ’em. They have absolutely zero influence on how someone does their job. — Patrick Neary
  • Tattoos literally have no effect on their ability to do their jobs and do their jobs well. Get over yourself. — Alan Jarmon
  • Many people get tattoos in remembrance of a loved one. You don’t just walk in a tattoo parlor just because. Every tattoo has a meaning. Can’t judge a book by its cover! — Tammie Lynn Coffin
  • Bad, bad, bad. There are countless examples of cops with tattoos that indicate racist ideas or attitudes, gang affiliation, etc. There are solid reasons to have tattoos covered up while on the job. Be it police, a nurse, a banker. It doesn’t matter. — John Smith
  • Isn’t the problem actually being a racist or a gang member? I’d think we’d be glad that we can identify them. I would much rather know who they are than not know. — Greg Layton
  • Cut down on the already shrinking number of people willing to take on jobs like this as it is. — Josh Renner
  • Different standards at different places. I can see both sides of this. But in the end, does it change who someone is if you see or not see a tattoo on someone or is the change in the one who sees it? — Jeff Grzeszczak

• That’s funny, and a lot of cops have tattoos, but the ones that don’t (not all of them) probably still view citizens with tats as probable cause. I have facial hair, and employers always say “clean-cut.” It’s not my hair they’re referring to. Unfortunately, many still view them as a stigma. It’s just as much art as a painting or graffiti for that m