Plans moving forward for rehab hospital in Milford

By Matt McDonald
Posted 8/17/22

MILFORD — Plans for a new medical building in southeastern Milford moved forward Tuesday, with the Milford Planning Commission voting to recommend that City Council approve the project. Members …

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Plans moving forward for rehab hospital in Milford

Posted

MILFORD — Plans for a new medical building in southeastern Milford moved forward Tuesday, with the Milford Planning Commission voting to recommend that City Council approve the project. Members will vote separately on the project later this month.

“We’re very excited to be able to impact the community and be able to make a difference in regards to the patient care, especially in central Delaware and all throughout,” said Ted Werner, CEO of Post Acute Medical.

The two-story facility will feature roughly 75,000 square feet of floor space, according to a site plan submitted to the city. The facility will primarily offer inpatient rehabilitation services, where patients can recover after being discharged from a hospital, said Anthony Lampasona, chief development officer at Catalyst Healthcare Real Estate, which is the owner and developer of the building.

The facility will also offer other services, including occupational speech therapy and dialysis.

The medical building will be next to Bayhealth Hospital, Sussex Campus. It will be jointly operated by Post Acute Medical and Bayhealth, Mr. Lampasona said. The new facility will help to free up beds at the Bayhealth hospital next door, he added. PAM also operates rehabilitation hospitals in Georgetown and Dover.

John Van Gorp, vice president of planning and business development at Bayhealth, said the Milford facility will give patients easier access to inpatient rehabilitation services without having to go through the hospital.

“It’s going to be a true benefit to everybody in the community,” he said.

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