Nanticoke Powwow moving to Hudson Fields in September

By Glenn Rolfe
Posted 7/9/21

MILTON — Back after a 2020 pandemic cancellation, the Nanticoke Powwow is on the move.

The Nanticoke Indian Association’s 43rd annual powwow will be a 2½-day event Sept. 10-12 at a new venue — Hudson Fields, near Milton.

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Nanticoke Powwow moving to Hudson Fields in September

Posted

MILTON — Back after a 2020 pandemic cancellation, the Nanticoke Powwow is on the move.

The Nanticoke Indian Association’s 43rd annual powwow will be a 2½-day event Sept. 10-12 at a new venue — Hudson Fields, near Milton.

Powwows in recent years had been held on wooded properties along John J. Williams Highway, east of Millsboro.

“Why is (it) that we moved? Just the opportunity for growth,” said Nanticoke Indian Association Chief Natosha Carmine. “We will miss the trees and ambiance of the Norwood property and the Price property, all of those who allowed us to have the powwow at their property.”

However, Hudson Fields will allow the powwow to grow and to have better exposure and accessibility, Chief Carmine said.

The 2021 event will feature Native American culture, heritage, customs, song and dance, rituals and food.

A vast array of vendors, including some representing Native American tribes from various parts of the United States, will be on-site during the powwow.

Admission will be $8 for adults and $5 for children ages 11-17. Kids 10 and under will be admitted free.

Following a vendors’ preview and pig roast Sept. 10, starting at 4, the powwow will be open two full days.

“We feel that with the COVID and everything, this is an opportunity for the vendors to hopefully have a good powwow weekend — in sales,” said Chief Carmine.

Grounds will officially open at 10 a.m. Sept. 11, although some people will arrive much earlier, she said.

The Grand Entry will be at noon, with a flag/staff procession entering the dance arena behind the head male and female dancers. There will be an honor song for the flag, an honor song for veterans and a welcoming from Chief Carmine. Two dance sessions will be held Saturday.

An observance is also planned for 9/11.

“Since this is the 20th anniversary and the day of 9/11, we will probably do something to remember, something special on Saturday to give remembrance, … a moment of prayer for the victims of 9/11 and the first responders,” said Chief Carmine.

The Sept. 12 schedule includes a worship service 8:30-10 a.m. and a Grand Entry for one dance session at noon.

Grounds will close Sept. 11 and 12 at 7 p.m.

“It is an exciting time for us,” said Chief Carmine, who is in her sixth year as chief of the association. “I think it’s a situation where everybody is excited to get out. Between the combination of everyone excited to get out and our new venue, it’s just really feeling kind of explosive, to be a part of preparing for this and the tribal families coming together.

“For me, the powwow is always a time of renewing and refreshing our spirit and honoring our elders and remembering our ancestors,” she continued. “And when those people go into the dance arena to dance, they go in (prayerfully). It’s exciting to be able to share this with the public. It is exciting that our young people will learn. We feel that we need this gathering.”