Clayton native serves aboard USS Iwo Jima

By Megan Brown, Navy Office of Community Outreach
Posted 5/8/21

ATLANTIC OCEAN — A 2009 Smyrna High School graduate and native of Clayton is serving aboard USS Iwo Jima, a U.S. Navy Wasp-class amphibious assault ship.

Staff Sgt. Jason Keskemety joined …

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Clayton native serves aboard USS Iwo Jima

Posted

ATLANTIC OCEAN — A 2009 Smyrna High School graduate and native of Clayton is serving aboard USS Iwo Jima, a U.S. Navy Wasp-class amphibious assault ship.


Staff Sgt. Jason Keskemety joined the Marine Corps 11 years ago to better himself and go on deployments throughout the world.


Today, Sgt. Keskemety serves as an airframes mechanic responsible for working on the structures, hydraulics systems, landing gear system and flight controls of the AV-8B Harriers.


Iwo Jima is the seventh Wasp-class amphibious assault ship and the second ship in the U.S. Navy to bear that name. The ship was named for the Battle of Iwo Jima of World War II.


According to Navy officials, amphibious assault ships are designed to deliver U.S. Marines and their equipment where they are needed to support a variety of missions ranging from amphibious assaults to humanitarian relief efforts.


Designed to be versatile, the ship has the option of simultaneously using helicopters, Harrier jets, and Landing Craft Air Cushioned (LCAC), as well as conventional landing craft and assault vehicles in various combinations.



According to Sgt. Keskemety, the values required to succeed in the Navy are similar to those found in Clayton.


“Clayton taught me to never to give up,” said Sgt. Keskemety. “You can always push yourself harder than before and make it to the top.”


Though there are many opportunities for Marines to earn recognition in their command, community and career, Sgt. Keskemety is most proud of raising a daughter and a son.


“I am also proud of becoming the subject matter expert at my job,” said Sgt. Keskemety.


As a member of the U.S. Marine Corps, Sgt. Keskemety, is proud to contribute to a military tradition.


“Serving in the Marine Corps means everything to me, it has shaped my life into the man I am today,” added Sgt. Keskemety. “From the friends that I have made to how I met my wife.”