Bill signed to expand providers’ dementia training in Delaware

By Tim Mastro
Posted 9/14/22

WILMINGTON — Legislators and advocates for Delaware’s dementia community, including the Alzheimer’s Association, witnessed Gov. John Carney sign Senate Bill 283 into law Thursday.

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Bill signed to expand providers’ dementia training in Delaware

Posted

WILMINGTON — Legislators and advocates for Delaware’s dementia community, including the Alzheimer’s Association, witnessed Gov. John Carney sign Senate Bill 283 into law Thursday.

The act amends Title 24 of the Delaware Code relating to continuing education. It requires practitioners licensed by the Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline and the Board of Nursing who treat adults to complete one hour of continuing education in each reporting period on the topic of diagnosis, treatment and care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.

“We are so grateful to Gov. Carney for his support of this bill and for the leadership and commitment of Sen. (Spiros) Mantzavinos and Rep. (Larry) Mitchell,” said Katie Macklin, senior director of advocacy for the Delaware Valley chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

“The passage of this legislation represents a big win for Delaware’s Alzheimer’s and dementia community. By strengthening the dementia competencies of our health care providers, Delaware stands out as a leader in providing quality care to all Delawareans impacted by the disease and their families.”

Gov. Carney was also thankful for the proposal.

“This legislation ensures our health care professionals are equipped with the skills to provide a better quality of life for those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia,” he said. “I want to thank Sen. Mantzavinos and the members of the General Assembly for protecting more than 19,000 Delawareans who are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease.”

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