City Council

Cambridge Movement, Chief Pittman honored

Remembrance Week will be last week of February

By Dave Ryan
Posted 2/25/21

CAMBRIDGE — Members of the City Council voted unanimously on  Feb. 23 to establish permanently the last week of February as “Cambridge Movement Remembrance Week.”

It’s …

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City Council

Cambridge Movement, Chief Pittman honored

Remembrance Week will be last week of February

Posted

CAMBRIDGE — Members of the City Council voted unanimously on  Feb. 23 to establish permanently the last week of February as “Cambridge Movement Remembrance Week.”

It’s only a beginning in a process honoring pioneers in the struggle for racial equality. Mayor Andrew Bradshaw said in the years to come, additional observances will be enacted to recall the work done in the city, especially during the turbulent times of 1961-64.
Among the groups and individuals concerned, the mayor said, are the Cambridge Non-Violent Action Committee and Gloria Richardson, a local leader who achieved national prominence.

Another daughter of Cambridge, U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman, was commended on Monday, in a virtual ceremony. Chief Pittman was elevated to leadership of the force following the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6, which led to the resignation of the former chief. She is the first woman and African American to occupy the post.

The chief expressed her gratitude to the mayor and council, family and friends, as well as “the greatest city on earth, I believe, Groove City.”
Looking back on her childhood, she remembered growing up at 409 Pine St., going to St. Clair Elementary School and graduating from Cambridge-South Dorchester High School.
“It is truly an honor and a privilege to be recognized as a history maker,” she said, while acknowledging that she “stood on the shoulders of others.”
Her life in Cambridge laid the foundation for her success, she said. She noted that she is surrounded by talented professionals who support her work, and asked for the continued prayers of her friends in Cambridge.

She said though the council was honoring her with its commendation, “I hope to honor you as I conduct my mission,” she said.
Contributions of the late Janelle Henry Buck will also be memorialized, if a request from the city is approved. “We will be sending a letter of support” to the Maryland State Highway Administration, Mayor Bradshaw said, for the placement of a sign dedicating a block between Race and Pine streets in honor of Ms. Buck.
As one of the owners and operators of the Henry Funeral Home at 510 Washington St., Ms. Buck assisted many local residents, particularly African-Americans during difficult personal times. This project, Mayor Bradshaw said, was initiated by Commissioner Sputty Cephas, who represents Ward 4.

She was, Mayor Bradshaw said, “Just the kind of person you would hope to have in a community.”

And a new generation of Black women is stepping up to leadership positions. LaJan Cephas, who represents Ward 2 on the Council, will take a seat on the Dorchester Heritage Area Management Board.
The moves are related to the town’s history of racial division and its movement into the future. “Healing wounds is a part of what this council has to do, and this is a step in that direction,” Mayor Bradshaw said.