Sussex County offers cooling stations to help with heat wave

Delaware State News
Posted 7/21/22

GEORGETOWN — Sussex County is offering a retreat for those looking to beat this week’s oppressive heat.

Officials announced Thursday the availability of several cooling stations, as the first major heat wave of the season strengthens its grip over Delmarva and the eastern United States.

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Sussex County offers cooling stations to help with heat wave

Posted

GEORGETOWN — Sussex County is offering a retreat for those looking to beat this week’s oppressive heat.

Officials announced Thursday the availability of several cooling stations, as the first major heat wave of the season strengthens its grip over Delmarva and the eastern United States.

National Weather Service forecasters are predicting that temperatures over the next several days will soar into the mid- and upper 90s, with heat index values at or exceeding 100 through the weekend.

While there may be a slight chance of thunderstorms, forecasters expect any cool-down to be short-lived.

Sussex leaders remind the public that select county facilities are always available as “cooling stations” in the summer during their regular hours.

These air-conditioned sites include:

  • County Administration Building, 2 The Circle, Georgetown, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays.
  • Greenwood Public Library, 100 Mill St., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays.
  • Milton Public Library, 121 Union St., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays; 10 a.m-6 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays.
  • South Coastal Library, 43 Kent Ave., Bethany Beach, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays.

County paramedics will make routine stops at these locations, as time permits, to address any heat-related concerns. Also, free bottles of water will be available.

When visiting a relief station, individuals are reminded to bring their medications and/or specialty items.

Officials urge residents and visitors to limit exposure outside, particularly during the hottest part of the day — 1-6 p.m. Those who must be outside are encouraged to take frequent breaks and drink plenty of water.

Some tips to weather the heat:

  • Wear lightweight and light-colored clothing. Lighter clothing deflects sunlight and will not absorb heat like dark materials do.
  • Stay in properly ventilated areas.
  • Avoid strenuous activity during the hottest part of the day.
  • Have plenty of water available. Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Be aware of the signs of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke, and seek medical attention if necessary. Signs of heat cramps can include muscular pains and spasms from heavy exertion. Resting in a cooler area, taking occasional sips of water and stretching the muscle mildly can counter the effects. Heat exhaustion and heatstroke are much more serious and may require immediate medical attention. Signs of heat exhaustion can include a pale or flushed appearance, as well as headache and nausea. Heatstroke symptoms include rapidly increased body temperature, loss of consciousness, rapid or weak pulse and fast, shallow breathing.

Also, residents are reminded to check on friends, relatives and neighbors, particularly the elderly and young children, who may be at risk for exposure to the heat. Remember to give pets extra water, provide shade or bring them into a residence where temperatures are cooler.

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