TRANSPORTATION

Ready, aim, shovels: Construction begins on East Camden Bypass

By Mike Finney
Posted 7/8/24

The wheels — and earth movers — officially got into motion on the $40 million East Camden Bypass on Monday, aiming to ease congestion and improve safety for all modes of transportation.

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TRANSPORTATION

Ready, aim, shovels: Construction begins on East Camden Bypass

Posted

CAMDEN — The wheels — and earth movers — officially got into motion on the $40 million East Camden Bypass on Monday, aiming to ease congestion and improve safety for all modes of transportation.

“This is the first of six infrastructure projects that will be taking place in the Camden area over the next several years that will provide needed improvements that will make the area safer and easier to travel, whether in a vehicle, on a bike or on foot,” said Delaware secretary of transportation Nicole Majeski.

The project is part of the Camden Bypass Study, adopted into the town’s comprehensive plan. Its purpose is to reduce traffic congestion along Del. 10 through Camden and improve operations at the U.S. 13/Del. 10 intersection, thereby boosting safety at the site.

Expected to be complete in August 2025, the work will eventually provide a connection to the future West Camden Bypass, at the intersection with U.S. 13, then head northeast on a new alignment to a roundabout on Del. 10.

That roundabout will provide access for a road alignment tying into existing Del. 10 and Rising Sun Road. The new road will then continue northeast to the existing intersection of U.S. 13 and Old North Road.

The construction will also provide connections to local streets in the project limits and offer multimodal accommodations, such as pedestrian crossings, a shared-use path connecting to the Capital City Trail and improved lighting.

To learn more, a virtual public meeting will be held July 16 at 4 p.m. To register, visit camdenareaprojects.com/stay-informed/public-meetings.

Regarding the construction, Charles “C.R.” McLeod, director of community relations for the Delaware Department of Transportation, said addressing traffic issues has become a pressing need in the Camden area.

“With the continued growth we’ve seen, both with the commercial development and residential development, we’re seeing an increased traffic volume in that area,” he said. “That’s no surprise to anyone who has to go through that area on a regular basis.

“We recognize the growth that is happening and that there are infrastructure needs there, and these projects are designed to address those issues.”

The early portion of the East Camden Bypass work is focusing largely on utility transfers.

“The first phase of work that’s starting, that’s going to be happening from July to September, and that’s primarily utility (relocations),” Mr. McLeod said. “Once those utility relocations are done, that’s when you’ll really start to see construction happening.”

He also highlighted the multimodal transportation and safety efforts.

“You’ve got a lot of through traffic, a lot of people moving north-south, and we’re also seeing a lot more people walking along Route 13, and we’re wanting to make it safer for people that aren’t in vehicles, as well,” he said.

“It’s not just about traffic volumes, but it’s about people who are going to and from the shopping centers, either for employment or just to shop, and don’t have a car. How do we make sure that they’re getting around safely, as well?

“These are things that are going to be addressed through these projects.”

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